William Miller

William Miller , PhD

Professor

Director of the Molecular Genetics Graduate Program

2206 Medical Sciences Building
231 Albert Sabin Way
Cincinnati, Ohio 45267
Phone 513-558-0866
Fax 513-558-5604
Email william.miller@uc.edu

Professional Summary

The Miller laboratory is interested in the mechanisms by which microbial pathogens manipulate host cell signal transduction pathways. We are using cytomegalovirus and Bordetella pertussis to examine how the pathogens alter signaling pathways directed by G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs). GPCRs represent the largest family of cell surface receptor proteins and play primary roles in numerous physiological processes ranging from regulation of cardiovascular tone to direction of cellular migration. Given the large number of signaling pathways regulated by GPCRs, it is not surprising that microbial pathogens encode proteins in their genomes that regulate signaling via this class of receptors. The cytomegaloviruses encode GPCRs that appear to signal via the Gq class of G-proteins and we are currently examining the membrane proximal events that regulate these viral GPCRs using molecular and biochemical techniques. We are also pursuing studies aimed at defining the impact that these viral GPCR have on pathogenesis in vivo. Using a genetics-based approach we are constructing viral mutants with targeted mutations in the viral GPCRs to define the mechanism of action of these proteins in cell culture and in vivo. Our second major focus is on the Bordetella pertussis encoded pertussis toxin. Pertussis toxin has long been known as a potent inhibitor of GPCR signaling pathways via the ability of its catalytic A subunit to inactivate the Gi class of G-proteins. We have been studying a novel mechanism by which pertussis toxin inhibits GPCR signaling pathways and have discovered that pertussis toxin can activate the T cell receptor and induce cross-desensitization of GPCRs such as CXCR4 and CCR5. This activity of pertussis toxin occurs independent of the previously described catalytic activity and is a result of the B subunit of the toxin. Our studies will shed light on the mechanisms of signaling involved in microbial pathogenesis and also uncover novel mechanisms by which intracellular signaling pathways are regulated. For more information please view William MIller's Biosketch.

Education

B.S.: Penn State University State College, PA, 1990 (Biology-Genetics and Development)

Ph.D.: University of North Carolina Chapel Hill, NC, 1997 (Microbiology and Immunology)

Post Doc: Duke University School of Medicine Durham, NC, 2002 (Biochemistry of Receptors)

Graduate Fellow: University of Cincinnati 2017

Research and Practice Interests

The Miller laboratory is interested in the mechanisms by which microbial pathogens manipulate host cell signal transduction pathways. We are using cytomegalovirus and Bordetella pertussis to examine how the pathogens alter signaling pathways directed by G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs). GPCRs represent the largest family of cell surface receptor proteins and play primary roles in numerous physiological processes ranging from regulation of cardiovascular tone to direction of cellular migration. Given the large number of signaling pathways regulated by GPCRs, it is not surprising that microbial pathogens encode proteins in their genomes that regulate signaling via this class of receptors. The cytomegaloviruses encode GPCRs that appear to signal via the Gq class of G-proteins and we are currently examining the membrane proximal events that regulate these viral GPCRs using molecular and biochemical techniques. We are also pursuing studies aimed at defining the impact that these viral GPCR have on pathogenesis in vivo. Using a genetics-based approach we are constructing viral mutants with targeted mutations in the viral GPCRs to define the mechanism of action of these proteins in cell culture and in vivo. Our second focus area is on the Bordetella pertussis encoded pertussis toxin. Pertussis toxin has long been known as a potent inhibitor of GPCR signaling pathways via the ability of its catalytic A subunit to inactivate the Gi class of G-proteins. We have been studying a novel mechanism by which pertussis toxin inhibits GPCR signaling pathways and have discovered that pertussis toxin can activate the T cell receptor and induce cross-desensitization of GPCRs such as CXCR4 and CCR5. This activity of pertussis toxin occurs independent of the previously described catalytic activity and is a result of the B subunit of the toxin. Our studies will shed light on the mechanisms of signaling involved in microbial pathogenesis and also uncover novel mechanisms by which intracellular signaling pathways are regulated.

Research Support

Grant: #R56-AI095442 Investigators:Miller 08-01-2012 -07-31-2015 NIH Role of Cytomegalovirus GPCRs in Pathogenesis in Vivo Role:PI $306,389 Completed Type:Grant

Grant: #MOD FY04-17 Investigators:Miller, William 02-01-2004 -07-31-2006 March of Dimes Regulation of Human Cytomegalovirus US28 Signaling by Beta-Arrestin Proteins Role:PI $150,000.00 Completed

Grant: #AHA 0465236B Investigators:Miller, William 07-01-2004 -06-30-2006 American Heart Association - Ohio Valley Intersection of the ALP PDZ/LIM Protein Role:PI $121,000.00 Completed

Grant: #R01 AI058159 Investigators:Miller, William 06-01-2005 -08-31-2011 National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases Regulation of Human Cytomegalovirus US28 Signal Transduction by Barrestin Proteins Role:PI $1,245,082.00 Completed

Grant: #R56 AI023695 Investigators:Miller, William; Monaco, John; Weiss, Alison 08-01-2008 -07-31-2009 National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases Biologic Activities of the Pertusis Toxin B-Pentamer Role:Collaborator $351,000.00 Completed

Grant: #2 R01 AI023695-20A1 Investigators:Miller, William; Monaco, John; Weiss, Alison 09-01-2009 -08-31-2012 National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases Biologic Activities of the Pertusis Toxin B-Pentamer Role:Collaborator $706,500.00 Completed

Grant: #Miller TAA Investigators:Miller, William 06-20-2011 -10-31-2011 Shenandoah Biotechnology, Inc. Evaluation of Biological Activity of Shenandoah Bioscience Produced Chemokines Role:PI $4,000.00 Completed

Grant: #1030707 Investigators:Miller, William 01-01-2012 -12-31-2014 National Health and Medical Research Council Defining A Virally-Encoded Molecular Switch Between Productive And Latent Phases Of Human Cytomegalovirus Infection Role:PI Completed Type:Grant

Grant: #Shenandoah M001 Investigators:Miller, William 02-01-2013 -01-31-2014 Shenandoah Biotechnology, Inc. Evaluation of Biological Activity of Shenandoah Biotechnology Produced Chemokines Role:PI $3,140.00 Completed

Grant: #R21 AI119415 Investigators:William E. Miller, Ph.D. 05-01-2015 -04-30-2018 National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases The Role of US28 during HCMV latency Role:PI $99,063.00 Active

Grant: #URC Interdisciplinary awards AY2014-15 Investigators:Miller, William; Bridges, James 05-01-2015 -06-30-2017 UC Development of Salisphere Model Systems for Studies of Cytomegalovirus Replication and Spread Within the Salivary Gland: Implications for Horizontal Virus Transmission Role:PI $25,000.00 Active

Grant: #136652 / R01 HL131634 Investigators:Miller, William 03-18-2016 -02-28-2021 National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute Role of GPR116 in Aveolar Homeostasis Role:PI $21,915.00 Active Level:Federal

Grant: #R56AI121028 Investigators:Casper, Keith; Menon, Anil; Miller, William 08-20-2016 -07-31-2017 National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases Mechanisms of vGPCR mediated Cytomegalovirus Growth in the Salivary Gland Role:PI $395,000.00 Active Level:Federal

Grant: #Cleveland Clinic sub R21AI119415 Investigators:Miller, William 12-21-2016 -04-30-2018 National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases The Role of US28 During HCMV Latency Role:PI $48,582.00 Awarded Level:Federal

Grant: #R21DE026267 Investigators:Menon, Anil; Miller, William 09-01-2017 -08-31-2019 National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research Development of salisphere-derived systems for the study of cytomegalovirus vGPCR directed viral growth in the salivary gland Role:PI $245,323.00 Awarded Level:Federal

Grant: #134164 / T32 HL125204 Investigators:Michael, Demetria; Miller, William 07-01-2017 -06-30-2018 National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute Understanding Cardiovascular Disease Mechanisms Role:PI $32,260.00 Awarded Level:Federal

Grant: #R01AI121028 Investigators:Miller, William 07-01-2018 -06-30-2022 National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases Mechanisms of vGPCR mediated Cytomegalovirus Growth in the Salivary Gland Role:PI $225,856.00 Active Level:Federal

Grant: #304790 / U01 AI130830 Investigators:Miller, William 08-24-2018 -05-31-2019 National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases Gene Regulation as a Foundation for Autoimmune Disease Prevention Role:PI $29,946.00 Active Level:Federal

Grant: #20PRE35200360 Investigators:Beucler, Matthew; Miller, William 01-01-2020 -12-31-2021 American Heart Association - National Chapter Role of human cytomegalovirus G Protein-coupled receptors in salivary epithelial cell replication and persistence Role:PI $31,016.00 Active Level:Private Non-Profit

Grant: #20122101 / R01HL131634 Investigators:Miller, William 12-17-2019 -02-28-2021 National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute Role of GPR116 in Alveolar Homeostasis Role:PI $16,029.00 Awarded Level:Federal

Grant: #CCHMC Billing Agreement - F31HL152600 Investigators:Martin, Kendall; Miller, William 04-09-2020 -04-08-2023 National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute Nr2f1a promotes atrial maintenance and ventricular growth in the embryonic zebrafish heart Role:PI $39,208.00 Awarded Level:Federal

Grant: #T32ES007250 Investigators:Miller, William; Puga, Alvaro; Stambrook, Peter 07-01-2020 -06-30-2025 National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Environmental Carcinogenesis and Mutagenesis Role:PI $518,536.00 Active Level:Federal

Grant: #CCHMC sub#312445 / R01HG010730 Investigators:Miller, William 06-15-2020 -04-30-2024 National Human Genome Research Institute Virus-driven human gene misregulation in disease Role:PI $27,105.00 Awarded Level:Federal

Grant: #F32HL158183 Investigators:Duong, Tiffany; Miller, William 03-01-2021 -02-28-2024 National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute Retinoic acid-dependent mechanisms patterning the cardiac progenitor fields Role:PI $38,883.00 Awarded Level:Federal

Grant: #T32ES007250 Investigators:Miller, William; Stambrook, Peter 09-30-2015 -06-30-2020 National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Environmental Carcinogenesis and Mutagenesis Role:PI 2381599.00 Active Level:Federal

Publications

Peer Reviewed Publications

Swope, Viki B; Jameson, Joshua A; McFarland, Kevin L; Supp, Dorothy M; Miller, William E; McGraw, Dennis W; Patel, Mira A; Nix, Matthew A; Millhauser, Glenn L; Babcock, George F; Abdel-Malek, Zalfa A (2012. ) Defining MC1R regulation in human melanocytes by its agonist alpha-melanocortin and antagonists agouti signaling protein and beta-defensin 3.The Journal of investigative dermatology, , 132 (9 ) ,2255-62

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Schneider, Olivia D; Millen, Scott H; Weiss, Alison A; Miller, William E (2012. ) Mechanistic insight into pertussis toxin and lectin signaling using T cells engineered to express a CD8alpha/CD3zeta chimeric receptor.Biochemistry, , 51 (20 ) ,4126-37

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Stropes, Melissa P; Schneider, Olivia D; Zagorski, William A; Miller, Jeanette L C; Miller, William E (2009. ) The carboxy-terminal tail of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) US28 regulates both chemokine-independent and chemokine-dependent signaling in HCMV-infected cells.Journal of virology, , 83 (19 ) ,10016-27

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Sherrill, Joseph D; Stropes, Melissa P; Schneider, Olivia D; Koch, Diana E; Bittencourt, Fabiola M; Miller, Jeanette L C; Miller, William E (2009. ) Activation of intracellular signaling pathways by the murine cytomegalovirus G protein-coupled receptor M33 occurs via PLC-beta/PKC-dependent and -independent mechanisms.Journal of virology, , 83 (16 ) ,8141-52

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Schneider, Olivia D; Weiss, Alison A; Miller, William E (2009. ) Pertussis toxin signals through the TCR to initiate cross-desensitization of the chemokine receptor CXCR4.Journal of immunology (Baltimore, Md. : 1950), , 182 (9 ) ,5730-9

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Shenoy, Sudha K; Modi, Aalok S; Shukla, Arun K; Xiao, Kunhong; Berthouze, Magali; Ahn, Seungkirl; Wilkinson, Keith D; Miller, William E; Lefkowitz, Robert J (2009. ) Beta-arrestin-dependent signaling and trafficking of 7-transmembrane receptors is reciprocally regulated by the deubiquitinase USP33 and the E3 ligase Mdm2.Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, , 106 (16 ) ,6650-5

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Sherrill, Joseph D; Miller, William E (2008. ) Desensitization of herpesvirus-encoded G protein-coupled receptors.Life sciences, , 82 (3-4 ) ,125-34

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Stropes, Melissa P M; Miller, William E (2008. ) Functional analysis of human cytomegalovirus pUS28 mutants in infected cells.The Journal of general virology, , 89 (Pt 1 ) ,97-105

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Schneider, Olivia D; Weiss, Alison A; Miller, William E (2007. ) Pertussis toxin utilizes proximal components of the T-cell receptor complex to initiate signal transduction events in T cells.Infection and immunity, , 75 (8 ) ,4040-9

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Sherrill, Joseph D; Miller, William E (2006. ) G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) kinase 2 regulates agonist-independent Gq/11 signaling from the mouse cytomegalovirus GPCR M33.The Journal of biological chemistry, , 281 (52 ) ,39796-805

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Wu, Jiao-Hui; Goswami, Robi; Kim, Luke K; Miller, William E; Peppel, Karsten; Freedman, Neil J (2005. ) The platelet-derived growth factor receptor-beta phosphorylates and activates G protein-coupled receptor kinase-2. A mechanism for feedback inhibition.The Journal of biological chemistry, , 280 (35 ) ,31027-35 More Information

Ardila-Osorio, Hector; Pioche-Durieu, Catherine; Puvion-Dutilleul, Francine; Clausse, Bernard; Wiels, Joëlle; Miller, William; Raab-Traub, Nancy; Busson, Pierre (2005. ) TRAF interactions with raft-like buoyant complexes, better than TRAF rates of degradation, differentiate signaling by CD40 and EBV latent membrane protein 1.International journal of cancer. Journal international du cancer, , 113 (2 ) ,267-75 More Information

Stropes, Melissa P M; Miller, William E (2004. ) Signaling and regulation of G-protein coupled receptors encoded by cytomegaloviruses.Biochemistry and cell biology = Biochimie et biologie cellulaire, , 82 (6 ) ,636-42 More Information

Mialet-Perez, Jeanne; Green, Stuart A; Miller, William E; Liggett, Stephen B (2004. ) A primate-dominant third glycosylation site of the beta2-adrenergic receptor routes receptors to degradation during agonist regulation.The Journal of biological chemistry, , 279 (37 ) ,38603-7 More Information

Witherow, D Scott; Garrison, Tiffany Runyan; Miller, William E; Lefkowitz, Robert J (2004. ) beta-Arrestin inhibits NF-kappaB activity by means of its interaction with the NF-kappaB inhibitor IkappaBalpha.Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, , 101 (23 ) ,8603-7 More Information

Wu, Jiao-Hui; Peppel, Karsten; Nelson, Christopher D; Lin, Fang-Tsyr; Kohout, Trudy A; Miller, William E; Exum, Sabrina T; Freedman, Neil J (2003. ) The adaptor protein beta-arrestin2 enhances endocytosis of the low density lipoprotein receptor.The Journal of biological chemistry, , 278 (45 ) ,44238-45 More Information

Chen, Wei; ten Berge, Derk; Brown, Jeff; Ahn, Seungkirl; Hu, Liaoyuan A; Miller, William E; Caron, Marc G; Barak, Larry S; Nusse, Roel; Lefkowitz, Robert J (2003. ) Dishevelled 2 recruits beta-arrestin 2 to mediate Wnt5A-stimulated endocytosis of Frizzled 4.Science (New York, N.Y.), , 301 (5638 ) ,1391-4 More Information

Miller, William E; Houtz, Daniel A; Nelson, Christopher D; Kolattukudy, P E; Lefkowitz, Robert J (2003. ) G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) kinase phosphorylation and beta-arrestin recruitment regulate the constitutive signaling activity of the human cytomegalovirus US28 GPCR.The Journal of biological chemistry, , 278 (24 ) ,21663-71 More Information

Ahn, Seungkirl; Nelson, Christopher D; Garrison, Tiffany Runyan; Miller, William E; Lefkowitz, Robert J (2003. ) Desensitization, internalization, and signaling functions of beta-arrestins demonstrated by RNA interference.Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, , 100 (4 ) ,1740-4 More Information

Perry, Stephen J; Baillie, George S; Kohout, Trudy A; McPhee, Ian; Magiera, Maria M; Ang, Kok Long; Miller, William E; McLean, Alison J; Conti, Marco; Houslay, Miles D; Lefkowitz, Robert J (2002. ) Targeting of cyclic AMP degradation to beta 2-adrenergic receptors by beta-arrestins.Science (New York, N.Y.), , 298 (5594 ) ,834-6 More Information

Feldman, David S; Zamah, A Musa; Pierce, Kristen L; Miller, William E; Kelly, Francine; Rapacciuolo, Antonio; Rockman, Howard A; Koch, Walter J; Luttrell, Louis M (2002. ) Selective inhibition of heterotrimeric Gs signaling. Targeting the receptor-G protein interface using a peptide minigene encoding the Galpha(s) carboxyl terminus.The Journal of biological chemistry, , 277 (32 ) ,28631-40 More Information

Laporte, Stephane A; Miller, William E; Kim, Kyeong-Man; Caron, Marc G (2002. ) beta-Arrestin/AP-2 interaction in G protein-coupled receptor internalization: identification of a beta-arrestin binging site in beta 2-adaptin.The Journal of biological chemistry, , 277 (11 ) ,9247-54 More Information

Chen, W; Hu, L A; Semenov, M V; Yanagawa, S; Kikuchi, A; Lefkowitz, R J; Miller, W E (2001. ) beta-Arrestin1 modulates lymphoid enhancer factor transcriptional activity through interaction with phosphorylated dishevelled proteins.Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, , 98 (26 ) ,14889-94 More Information

Imamura, T; Huang, J; Dalle, S; Ugi, S; Usui, I; Luttrell, L M; Miller, W E; Lefkowitz, R J; Olefsky, J M (2001. ) beta -Arrestin-mediated recruitment of the Src family kinase Yes mediates endothelin-1-stimulated glucose transport.The Journal of biological chemistry, , 276 (47 ) ,43663-7 More Information

Claing, A; Chen, W; Miller, W E; Vitale, N; Moss, J; Premont, R T; Lefkowitz, R J (2001. ) beta-Arrestin-mediated ADP-ribosylation factor 6 activation and beta 2-adrenergic receptor endocytosis.The Journal of biological chemistry, , 276 (45 ) ,42509-13 More Information

Miller, W E; McDonald, P H; Cai, S F; Field, M E; Davis, R J; Lefkowitz, R J (2001. ) Identification of a motif in the carboxyl terminus of beta -arrestin2 responsible for activation of JNK3.The Journal of biological chemistry, , 276 (30 ) ,27770-7 More Information

Miller, W E; Lefkowitz, R J (2001. ) Expanding roles for beta-arrestins as scaffolds and adapters in GPCR signaling and trafficking. Current opinion in cell biology, , 13 (2 ) ,139-45

Luttrell, L M; Roudabush, F L; Choy, E W; Miller, W E; Field, M E; Pierce, K L; Lefkowitz, R J (2001. ) Activation and targeting of extracellular signal-regulated kinases by beta-arrestin scaffolds.Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, , 98 (5 ) ,2449-54 More Information

Miller, W E; Lefkowitz, R J (2001. ) Arrestins as signaling molecules involved in apoptotic pathways: a real eye opener.Science's STKE : signal transduction knowledge environment, , 2001 (69 ) ,pe1 More Information

Hu, L A; Tang, Y; Miller, W E; Cong, M; Lau, A G; Lefkowitz, R J; Hall, R A (2000. ) beta 1-adrenergic receptor association with PSD-95. Inhibition of receptor internalization and facilitation of beta 1-adrenergic receptor interaction with N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors.The Journal of biological chemistry, , 275 (49 ) ,38659-66 More Information

McDonald, P H; Chow, C W; Miller, W E; Laporte, S A; Field, M E; Lin, F T; Davis, R J; Lefkowitz, R J (2000. ) Beta-arrestin 2: a receptor-regulated MAPK scaffold for the activation of JNK3. Science (New York, N.Y.), , 290 (5496 ) ,1574-7

Miller, W E; Maudsley, S; Ahn, S; Khan, K D; Luttrell, L M; Lefkowitz, R J (2000. ) beta-arrestin1 interacts with the catalytic domain of the tyrosine kinase c-SRC. Role of beta-arrestin1-dependent targeting of c-SRC in receptor endocytosis. The Journal of biological chemistry, , 275 (15 ) ,11312-9

Maudsley, S; Pierce, K L; Zamah, A M; Miller, W E; Ahn, S; Daaka, Y; Lefkowitz, R J; Luttrell, L M (2000. ) The beta(2)-adrenergic receptor mediates extracellular signal-regulated kinase activation via assembly of a multi-receptor complex with the epidermal growth factor receptor. The Journal of biological chemistry, , 275 (13 ) ,9572-80

Seo, B; Choy, E W; Maudsley, S; Miller, W E; Wilson, B A; Luttrell, L M (2000. ) Pasteurella multocida toxin stimulates mitogen-activated protein kinase via G(q/11)-dependent transactivation of the epidermal growth factor receptor. The Journal of biological chemistry, , 275 (3 ) ,2239-45

Tang, Y; Hu, L A; Miller, W E; Ringstad, N; Hall, R A; Pitcher, J A; DeCamilli, P; Lefkowitz, R J (1999. ) Identification of the endophilins (SH3p4/p8/p13) as novel binding partners for the beta1-adrenergic receptor. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, , 96 (22 ) ,12559-64

Lin, F T; Miller, W E; Luttrell, L M; Lefkowitz, R J (1999. ) Feedback regulation of beta-arrestin1 function by extracellular signal-regulated kinases. The Journal of biological chemistry, , 274 (23 ) ,15971-4

Luttrell, L M; Ferguson, S S; Daaka, Y; Miller, W E; Maudsley, S; Della Rocca, G J; Lin, F; Kawakatsu, H; Owada, K; Luttrell, D K; Caron, M G; Lefkowitz, R J (1999. ) Beta-arrestin-dependent formation of beta2 adrenergic receptor-Src protein kinase complexes. Science (New York, N.Y.), , 283 (5402 ) ,655-61

Fries, K L; Miller, W E; Raab-Traub, N (1999. ) The A20 protein interacts with the Epstein-Barr virus latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1) and alters the LMP1/TRAF1/TRADD complex.Virology, , 264 (1 ) ,159-66 More Information

Miller, W E; Raab-Traub, N (1999. ) The EGFR as a target for viral oncoproteins. Trends in microbiology, , 7 (11 ) ,453-8

Takeshita, H; Yoshizaki, T; Miller, W E; Sato, H; Furukawa, M; Pagano, J S; Raab-Traub, N (1999. ) Matrix metalloproteinase 9 expression is induced by Epstein-Barr virus latent membrane protein 1 C-terminal activation regions 1 and 2. Journal of virology, , 73 (7 ) ,5548-55

Miller, W E; Cheshire, J L; Raab-Traub, N (1998. ) Interaction of tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor signaling proteins with the latent membrane protein 1 PXQXT motif is essential for induction of epidermal growth factor receptor expression. Molecular and cellular biology, , 18 (5 ) ,2835-44

Miller, W E; Cheshire, J L; Baldwin, A S; Raab-Traub, N (1998. ) The NPC derived C15 LMP1 protein confers enhanced activation of NF-kappa B and induction of the EGFR in epithelial cells.Oncogene, , 16 (14 ) ,1869-77 More Information

Hatzivassiliou, E; Miller, W E; Raab-Traub, N; Kieff, E; Mosialos, G (1998. ) A fusion of the EBV latent membrane protein-1 (LMP1) transmembrane domains to the CD40 cytoplasmic domain is similar to LMP1 in constitutive activation of epidermal growth factor receptor expression, nuclear factor-kappa B, and stress-activated protein kinase. Journal of immunology (Baltimore, Md. : 1950), , 160 (3 ) ,1116-21

Patel, A; Hanson, J; McLean, T I; Olgiate, J; Hilton, M; Miller, W E; Bachenheimer, S L (1998. ) Herpes simplex type 1 induction of persistent NF-kappa B nuclear translocation increases the efficiency of virus replication. Virology, , 247 (2 ) ,212-22

Miller, W E; Mosialos, G; Kieff, E; Raab-Traub, N (1997. ) Epstein-Barr virus LMP1 induction of the epidermal growth factor receptor is mediated through a TRAF signaling pathway distinct from NF-kappaB activation. Journal of virology, , 71 (1 ) ,586-94

Fries, K L; Miller, W E; Raab-Traub, N (1996. ) Epstein-Barr virus latent membrane protein 1 blocks p53-mediated apoptosis through the induction of the A20 gene. Journal of virology, , 70 (12 ) ,8653-9

Miller, W E; Earp, H S; Raab-Traub, N (1995. ) The Epstein-Barr virus latent membrane protein 1 induces expression of the epidermal growth factor receptor. Journal of virology, , 69 (7 ) ,4390-8

Miller, W E; Edwards, R H; Walling, D M; Raab-Traub, N (1994. ) Sequence variation in the Epstein-Barr virus latent membrane protein 1. The Journal of general virology, , 75 ( Pt 10) ,2729-40

Miller, William E; Zagorski, William A; Brenneman, Joanna D; Avery, Diana; Miller, Jeanette L C; O (2012. ) US28 is a potent activator of phospholipase C during HCMV infection of clinically relevant target cells.PloS one, , 7 (11 ) ,e50524

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Luttrell, Louis M; Miller, William E (2013. ) Arrestins as regulators of kinases and phosphatases.Progress in molecular biology and translational science, , 118 ,115-47

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O'Connor, C. M. and Miller, W. E. (2014. ) Methods for Studying the Function of Cytomegalovirus GPCRs.Methods in Molecular Biology: Human Cytomegaloviruses, , 1119 ,133-64

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Simard, Elie; Kovacs, Jeffrey J; Miller, William E; Kim, Jihee; Grandbois, Michel; Lefkowitz, Robert J (2013. ) Beta-Arrestin regulation of myosin light chain phosphorylation promotes AT1aR-mediated cell contraction and migration.PloS one, , 8 (11 ) ,e80532

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Millen, Scott H; Schneider, Olivia D; Miller, William E; Monaco, John J; Weiss, Alison A (2013. ) Pertussis toxin B-pentamer mediates intercellular transfer of membrane proteins and lipids.PloS one, , 8 (9 ) ,e72885

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Bittencourt, Fabiola M; Wu, Shu-En; Bridges, James P; Miller, William E (2014. ) The M33 G protein-coupled receptor encoded by murine cytomegalovirus is dispensable for hematogenous dissemination but is required for growth within the salivary gland.Journal of virology, , 88 (20 ) ,11811-24

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Wu, Shu-En; Miller, William E (2015. ) The human cytomegalovirus lytic cycle is induced by 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 in peripheral blood monocytes and in the THP-1 monocytic cell line.Virology, , 483 ,83-95

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Wu, Shu-En; Miller, William E (2016. ) The HCMV US28 vGPCR induces potent Galphaq/PLeta signaling in monocytes leading to increased adhesion to endothelial cells.Virology, , 497 ,233-243

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Low, Hann; Mukhamedova, Nigora; Cui, Huanhuan L; McSharry, Brian P; Avdic, Selmir; Hoang, Anh; Ditiatkovski, Michael; Liu, Yingying; Fu, Ying; Meikle, Peter J; Blomberg, Martin; Polyzos, Konstantinos A; Miller, William E; Religa, Piotr; Bukrinsky, Michael; Soderberg-Naucler, Cecilia; Slobedman, Barry; Sviridov, Dmitri (2016. ) Cytomegalovirus Restructures Lipid Rafts via a US28/CDC42-Mediated Pathway, Enhancing Cholesterol Efflux from Host Cells.Cell Reports, , 16 (1 ) ,186-200

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Dogra, Pranay; Miller-Kittrell, Mindy; Pitt, Elisabeth; Jackson, Joseph W; Masi, Tom; Copeland, Courtney; Wu, Shuen; Miller, William E; Sparer, Tim (2016. ) A little cooperation helps murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) go a long way: MCMV co-infection rescues a chemokine salivary gland defect.The Journal of general virology, , 97 (11 ) ,2957-2972 More Information

K. Brown, A. Filuta, M-G. Ludwig, K. Seuwen, J. Jaros, S. Vidal, K. Arora, A. Naren, K. Kandasamy, K. Parthasarathi, S. Offermanns, R. Mason, W.E. Miller, J.A. Whitsett, J. Bridges (2017. ) Epithelial Adgrf5 (Gpr116) Regulates Pulmonary Alveolar Homeostasis via Gq/11 Signaling.JCI Insight, , 2 (11 ) ,1-11 More Information

Krishna, Benjamin A; Miller, William E; O'Connor, Christine M (2018. ) US28: HCMV's Swiss Army Knife.Viruses, , 10 (8 ) , More Information

Krishna, Benjamin A; Humby, Monica S; Miller, William E; O'Connor, Christine M (2019. ) Human cytomegalovirus G protein-coupled receptor US28 promotes latency by attenuating c-fos.Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, , 116 (5 ) ,1755-1764 More Information

Morrison, Kristen M; Beucler, Matthew J; Campbell, Emily O; White, Margaret A; Boody, Rachel E; Wilson, Keith C; Miller, William E (2019. ) Development of a Primary Human Cell Model for the Study of Human Cytomegalovirus Replication and Spread within Salivary Epithelium.Journal of virology, , 93 (3 ) , More Information

Beucler, Matthew J; Miller, William E (2019. ) Isolation of Salivary Epithelial Cells from Human Salivary Glands for In Vitro Growth as Salispheres or Monolayers.Journal of visualized experiments : JoVE, , (149 ) , More Information

O'Connor, Christine M; Miller, William E (2021. ) Methods for Studying the Function of Cytomegalovirus GPCRs.Methods in molecular biology (Clifton, N.J.), , 2244 ,159-197 More Information

Honors and Awards

1988 -1990 C.D. Prutzman Undergraduate Scholarship, Penn State University

1989 -1990 Dean's List, Penn State University

1996 Lineberger Award for Excellence in Research, University of North Carolina

2004 March of Dimes Basil O'Connor Scholar Award

Professional Affiliation

2003 -To Present: American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

2007 -To Present: American Society for Microbiology

2007 -To Present: American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics

2012 -To Present: American Chemical Society

Courses Taught

-MG-7024 MECH SIG TRANS Mechanisms of Signal Transduction Level:Graduate

-GNTD-7002 BIOCHEM/CELL SIGNAL Biochemistry and Cell Signaling Core Course Level:Graduate

Contact Information

Academic - 2206 Medical Sciences Building
231 Albert Sabin Way
Cincinnati  Ohio, 45267
Phone: 513-558-0866
Fax: 513-558-5604
william.miller@uc.edu